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Five Best Interviewing Tips for The Successful Job Seeker

05.09.2016

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It is one heck of a competitive marketplace for job seekers today. Reception areas of today's corporations are littered with candidates who are boasting MBAs, volunteer experience around the world, and professional memberships galore. So, the question is: How do you separate yourself from that herd as the candidate of choice? Or, if you have a slightly lesser degree and may be lacking in another area such as volunteer work, how do you even the playing field with those candidates that have a standout resume? Well, nailing down the job interview is a good place to start. It's also a good place to seal the deal. Making a great first impression has the ability to supersede any exceptional resume or professionally written cover letter. What follows are five best interviewing tips to help you do just that:

  1. Show up on Time – This really should go without saying, but it is positively shocking how many people don't adhere to this common sense principle the way they should. The old rule of thumb still applies — Aim to show up for a job interview or really any important professional meeting at least ten minutes early. This should give you enough time to account for traffic delays and still have a few minutes to get comfortable and gather yourself before your meeting.
  2. Power Down – Show the person you are meeting with some respect by shutting off your cell phone for the entire interview. We know you may miss that important social media post from a Kardashian talking about what they're going to wear to the next red carpet event they have no business being at, but that's okay. Don't just silence the ringer either. Sometimes that vibration against a wooden chair can make more noise than the actual ring of a smartphone. Power down just for this one important meeting. You won't regret it.
  3. Play Nice in The Sandbox – There's an important distinction to be made here between being seen as a kiss-up and a genuinely likable human being. That distinction is this — Be nice to everyone you meet that day. No matter how painful this might be. Be nice to the receptionist, the door man if there is one, and even the other candidates in the waiting room. Often times, an interviewer will ask colleagues and other people you met that day what they thought of you. You don't want someone remembering you as standoffish or abrupt in that case. Be polite and professional without overdoing it.
  4. Ask Questions – Many potential employers value the questions interviewees ask higher than they do the answers they get from them. Take the time to memorize at least two or three questions you can ask the employer. It shows that you have given this opportunity some thought and have some genuine concern for how you will approach doing a great job for them. Many times if two candidates possess equal skill sets and are thought of as evenly qualified, the questions they ask can be a differentiating factor in who gets the job.
  5. Do Your Homework – Take at least 20-30 minutes before the interview to conduct some research on the company, the job requirements, and the background of the person you are meeting with. Having specific details about these items can go a long way in showing you are well prepared and have a sufficient knowledge base to do well in that role. Use Google, the company's website, LinkedIn, and any other available resource to gather this information. It is likely to come very much in handy.

Azimuth provides complete staffing and human resources assistance to match your staffing requirements within your financial resources. Please visit our website for more information today on how we can help your organization secure the top tier talent within your industry.